July132014

the-world-is-a-corner said: Incidentally, since we've gone on and on about Adam's father, and Ronan's parents opinion on it - what do you think Ronan's DAD would think of his titanic crush on Adam?

sarasarai:

What’s the polar opposite gif of this?

image

Heathers!

July32014
tamorapierce:

flavorpill:


This morning, The Atlantic published a piece by Noah Berlatsky about the “irresponsible portrayal of men” on Orange Is the New Black. Orange, a groundbreaking show with a wonderful and admirably diverse cast, is set inside a women’s prison, and the characters definitely reflect that setting. It’s a show created by a woman (Jenji Kohan), based on a memoir written by a woman (Piper Kerman). It’s a show that aims to tell women’s stories —and it succeeds masterfully— but Berlatsky’s complaint, naturally, is that the show “barely, and inadequately” represents men.
“This may seem like a silly complaint,” he writes before launching into a truly silly complaint. Berlatsky’s first, most basic argument for why Orangeshould include more men is the fact that real-life prisons are populated by far more men than women. This is very true and unfortunate, but that shouldn’t have much bearing on a show set inside a women’s prison. If HBO’s Ozwere failing to adequately portray men, then by all means, let’s talk about it! But this isn’t Oz, nor is this a male-centric show. There is, without a doubt, a lot to discuss and debate when it comes to male prisons and prisoners, and the cultural attitudes surrounding them — particular black male inmates — but a piece on Orange Is the New Blackis hardly the place to discuss it. It’s a subject that deserves a more nuanced and thoughtful take, not one haphazardly attached to Netflix program about women.

No, ‘Orange Is the New Black’ Doesn’t Need to Focus on Men’s Stories

What, he thought it was set in Folsom but got the cast wrong?
Goddess save us from stupid critics.

My boyfriend and I love this show and neither of us have had any issues about mis or under representing any genders. There is enough of a male presence to compliment the female stories that go on in this series. That’s right female stories. Because this series focuses on the females in this female prison. Get used it

tamorapierce:

flavorpill:

This morning, The Atlantic published a piece by Noah Berlatsky about the “irresponsible portrayal of men” on Orange Is the New BlackOrange, a groundbreaking show with a wonderful and admirably diverse cast, is set inside a women’s prison, and the characters definitely reflect that setting. It’s a show created by a woman (Jenji Kohan), based on a memoir written by a woman (Piper Kerman). It’s a show that aims to tell women’s stories —and it succeeds masterfully— but Berlatsky’s complaint, naturally, is that the show “barely, and inadequately” represents men.

“This may seem like a silly complaint,” he writes before launching into a truly silly complaint. Berlatsky’s first, most basic argument for why Orangeshould include more men is the fact that real-life prisons are populated by far more men than women. This is very true and unfortunate, but that shouldn’t have much bearing on a show set inside a women’s prison. If HBO’s Ozwere failing to adequately portray men, then by all means, let’s talk about it! But this isn’t Oz, nor is this a male-centric show. There is, without a doubt, a lot to discuss and debate when it comes to male prisons and prisoners, and the cultural attitudes surrounding them — particular black male inmates — but a piece on Orange Is the New Blackis hardly the place to discuss it. It’s a subject that deserves a more nuanced and thoughtful take, not one haphazardly attached to Netflix program about women.

No, ‘Orange Is the New Black’ Doesn’t Need to Focus on Men’s Stories

What, he thought it was set in Folsom but got the cast wrong?

Goddess save us from stupid critics.

My boyfriend and I love this show and neither of us have had any issues about mis or under representing any genders. There is enough of a male presence to compliment the female stories that go on in this series. That’s right female stories. Because this series focuses on the females in this female prison. Get used it

June202014
Every day.

Every day.

(Source: iloveyoursoul, via seananmcguire)

June162014

Where’s my lady stone heart HBO? Where’s my fucking lady stone heart.

June112014
“Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

C.S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children,” 1952

(via the comments section of TNR's excellent response to The Slate Article That Shall Not Be Linked To.)

(Source: elizabethminkel, via maggie-stiefvater)

June62014

laurendestefano:

guys! I would like to just reinforce the fact that I love the book community. As many of you are probably well aware, there are many highbrow critics who will discourage adults from reading books that are “for children.” As a person who writes, and reads YA, I know that the age printed on the jacket is merely a tool to help booksellers shelve the book. It is NOT a guideline meant to exclude readers. I write this stuff. I know who my readers are. I know who I’m targeting, and that’s just about everyone.

Today an article went up that meant to shame YA readers. I won’t link to it, because in my opinion it was just another clickbait article, and I see them every week. However, I took to twitter and I asked people to channel their outrage into something positive and instead share their favorite YA titles with the hashtag #PromoteAYAinstead. It became SECOND TO TOP TREND IN THE UNITED STATES in less than an hour!

This is the kind of positivity I want to promote in this lovely community. Even if you aren’t on twitter, I’d encourage you to check out the hashtag. There are some great titles being recommended. And most of all, STAY POSITIVE. There is more book love than any of the hoity toities can even know about, as they sit at their desks with their mug of congealed noodles and their expert opinions. And let this be a lesson to aspiring authors as well, because this kind of nay-saying plagued me when I said I wanted to be an author someday. Look how that turned out.

Note: If you follow the hashtag, note the “a” before “YA” ;)

YA is the best. Love this fandom

12PM
summerscourtney:

So here is some news about my next project that I have that just went up in Publishers Marketplace! Courtney Summers’s PLEASE REMAIN CALM, an e-novella sequel to her zombie novel THIS IS NOT A TEST, about the remaining survivors from the first novel, discovering just how high the cost of death is in a post-apocalyptic landscape, to Sara Goodman at St. Martin’s, by Amy Tipton at Signature Literary Agency (World English). I think THIS IS NOT A TEST is the novel I get the most sequel requests for and I honestly don’t know what those characters did to deserve that after the hell I put them through, but I’m grateful for the expressed interest in the ones who made it out—yes, you will see familiar faces—and all the terrible things that might happen to them next.  (Things are going to get very bad.)  (MORE ZOMBIES!)  I’ll share more details when I have them.  But I am very excited and I hope you are too.  I am so glad my editor and agent didn’t blink the first time I told them I wanted to write zombies or the second time, either.BY THE WAY.  If you haven’t read THIS IS NOT A TEST, there’s no time like the present!  It’s about a girl named Sloane who intends to kill herself the morning the zombie apocalypse starts.  She ends up trapped in her high school with six other survivors instead.  Think THE WALKING DEAD meets THE BREAKFAST CLUB.  (I might be biased but I think it is a great read if are waiting on S5 of TWD.)  You can find out more about it—excerpt, reviews, book trailer—at http://courtneysummers.ca/novels/this-is-not-a-test Oh heck how about I just give away some copies right here too?  How about 3 signed copies of THIS IS NOT A TEST plus signed bookmarks to 3 winners!  This giveaway is open to entrants worldwide and to enter, all you have to do is reblog this post.  I will give one additional entry to followers of summerscourtney, too. Winners will be randomly selected and must have a way for me to contact them or new winners will be selected.  The contest will end June 30th, 2014!

summerscourtney:

So here is some news about my next project that I have that just went up in Publishers Marketplace!

Courtney Summers’s PLEASE REMAIN CALM, an e-novella sequel to her zombie novel THIS IS NOT A TEST, about the remaining survivors from the first novel, discovering just how high the cost of death is in a post-apocalyptic landscape, to Sara Goodman at St. Martin’s, by Amy Tipton at Signature Literary Agency (World English).

I think THIS IS NOT A TEST is the novel I get the most sequel requests for and I honestly don’t know what those characters did to deserve that after the hell I put them through, but I’m grateful for the expressed interest in the ones who made it out—yes, you will see familiar faces—and all the terrible things that might happen to them next.  (Things are going to get very bad.)  (MORE ZOMBIES!)  I’ll share more details when I have them.  But I am very excited and I hope you are too.  I am so glad my editor and agent didn’t blink the first time I told them I wanted to write zombies or the second time, either.

BY THE WAY.  If you haven’t read THIS IS NOT A TEST, there’s no time like the present!  It’s about a girl named Sloane who intends to kill herself the morning the zombie apocalypse starts.  She ends up trapped in her high school with six other survivors instead.  Think THE WALKING DEAD meets THE BREAKFAST CLUB.  (I might be biased but I think it is a great read if are waiting on S5 of TWD.)  You can find out more about it—excerpt, reviews, book trailer—at http://courtneysummers.ca/novels/this-is-not-a-test

Oh heck how about I just give away some copies right here too?  How about 3 signed copies of THIS IS NOT A TEST plus signed bookmarks to 3 winners!  This giveaway is open to entrants worldwide and to enter, all you have to do is reblog this post.  I will give one additional entry to followers of summerscourtney, too. Winners will be randomly selected and must have a way for me to contact them or new winners will be selected.  The contest will end June 30th, 2014!

12PM
June32014

tamorapierce:

harperprice:

book meme: 1/10 series/books —-> The Diviners

“She was tired of being told how it was by this generation, who’d botched things so badly. They’d sold their children a pack of lies: God and country. Love your parents. All is fair. And then they’d sent those boys, her brother, off to fight a great monster of a war that maimed and killed and destroyed whatever was inside them. Still they lied, expecting her to mouth the words and play along. Well, she wouldn’t. She knew now that the world was a long way from fair. She knew the monsters were real.”

Don’t taunt me if you don’t have the second book IN YOUR HAND

Loved this book trailer!

May232014

Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2)

Lest we forget, she’s also the first known queer American in space.

(via themarysue)

(via lbardugo)

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